3D Printing Chocolate and Ice

Have you started to become bored of thermoplastics? Interested in creating edible printed objects? Want to increase your rate of production? Me too!

Last week we created a mold for the "I Love You" box. It came out great and we are enjoying working with it. However it consumed quite a lot of material, most of which is not in contact with the print, just wasted silicone.

This week we wanted to plan a more efficient use of the Oomoo material, and create molds that can be suitable for resin, plaster, chocolate, or ice.

The Oomoo materials are stable between -40F and 400F, which opens us up to a wide range of castable materials.

 

First we had to choose a design. I have been enjoying printing Buddha's lately and this set of See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil Buddhas scanned by 3DWP are perfect for the goals we are trying to accomplish.

We scaled the Buddhas to 22mm in height, and then printed at 0.05mm Z height. Each Buddha only required 1.5 grams, so this was a great opportunity to use the ends of spools we had laying around.

 

From the last mold making adventure we learned that the layer lines will be visible in each casting made. To remove any layer lines we used a very thin layer of XTC3D, which was thinned 50% with acetone. We actually just dipped the Buddhas in a cup containing the XTC3D and then placed them to dry on prepared poster board. The remaining XTC3D was used to coat a few other projects.

After calculating the volume required to cover the set of 12 we realized we wouldn't have enough material so we added a divider in the box to make a set of 6.

Mixing!

Mixing!

I read somewhere that if you don't have access to a vacuum pump to remove air bubbles, pouring in a thin stream will help.

I read somewhere that if you don't have access to a vacuum pump to remove air bubbles, pouring in a thin stream will help.

We also glued down a triple Buddha in a dixie cup for any extra silicone we may have, turned out we had just enough.

We also glued down a triple Buddha in a dixie cup for any extra silicone we may have, turned out we had just enough.

After we poured the silicone we took the proto-molds into the garage and placed them on top of our vibratory tumbler (which we are trying to figure out how to use to sand prints). The vibratory tumbler shook out a bunch of bubbles from the silicone.

You can really see the details came out, even the beads on the necklaces.

You can really see the details came out, even the beads on the necklaces.

Melting chocolate, I really need a slow cooker or double boiler for this.

Melting chocolate, I really need a slow cooker or double boiler for this.

The chocolate came out very viscous, I'm surprised it went in the mold at all.

The chocolate came out very viscous, I'm surprised it went in the mold at all.

Quite please with the results considering the viscous chocolate!

Quite please with the results considering the viscous chocolate!

Ice Buddhas! More pictures coming later!

Ice Buddhas! More pictures coming later!

Overall I'm pleased with the Oomoo molds but am concerned about their longevity. Mold-Max looks stronger but maybe more difficult to work with. I'm also ready to move on to two part molds.